A Guide to Implementing OKRs

This is the second part in our series on OKRs. To read the first part, click here.

OKRs are a proven tool for managing organizational performance as chronicled in John Doerr’s book “Measure What Matters.” Over the past few years, I have been able to exercise this management platform as a business leader, investor, and consultant at seven different companies. Each company has been a bit different in its implementation of the tool. All were able to dramatically improve their business performance. One of the best ways to embed OKRs in the fabric of the organization is to make them the foundation of your planning. You should address the OKRs at annual planning and during monthly business reviews.

One of the first challenges that companies face is the planning horizon associated with OKRs. In general, I would suggest that the objectives are annual, and the key results are a mix of monthly and quarterly measures. The CEO plays a key role in establishing the objectives for the organization while each functional area owns the key results.

The CEO should distribute the objectives a couple of weeks in advance of the annual planning meeting. Each functional area should then develop their key results, aligned to the corporate objectives. The sequence of the review of OKRs should follow “digital production line” of the organization. They should start at product creation, carry over into commercialization, play a key role in execution, and also embedded in the business support functions of the organization . The management team should use this process to ensure that the inputs and outputs of each function align to the greater objectives for the organization.

The OKR system should be a foundational part of the monthly business review. Each functional area should recap their performance based upon their function’s OKRs. This streamlines the monthly business review while focusing the management team on improving performance across the organization. The sequence of your review should follow the “digital production line” much like the annual planning process. An OKR dashboard should label those key results in green that are on track and those not achieved in red. Yellow is not allowed. If a team must mark a key result as red, then that team or individual should develop a corrective action plan. The corrective action plan should include the following sections:

  • Problem statement
  • Reflection on prior activities
  • Root cause analysis
  • Recommendations
  • Action plan

If you follow this planning discipline, it will be relatively easy to embed the OKR system in the fabric of your company. At AngelMD, we encourage our startups to leverage this powerful management tool. The best ingredient to a great idea is great execution.

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Check out Your New AngelMD Startup Dashboard

We’re always looking for ways to improve your AngelMD experience. Today we’re letting you know about some improvements that we’ve made to your Startup Dashboard.

It all starts with the design. We’ve given your Dashboard a makeover that focuses on making your life easier. You’ll now see a larger version of your logo on the left side of the page. If you want to edit your company information or your settings, you can do so by clicking on the three dots to the right of your logo. You can still access your settings from the top right, but we wanted to make it easier for you to keep your profile up to date.

The right side of your Dashboard now includes a snapshot of your visitors from week to week. Now you’re able to see the results of your work on AngelMD at a glance. Not getting the eyeballs that you want? Make sure you are posting status updates and sharing information through your profile.

Speaking of posting startup news, it’s now easier than ever. The new interface in the middle of your screen gives you quick access to share a message. If you make a mistake, don’t worry, this isn’t Twitter. You can easily edit a post by hovering over its top right corner and clicking the three dots to bring up the Edit or Delete options. Your new Activity Analytics will let you know, at a glance, who has been watching what you’re sharing.

If you’re curious about who will be seeing those updates, that’s now easier to track as well. You can now see all of your company’s connections across the AngelMD network. Investors, Advisors, and Followers are all available from the box on the right side of your Dashboard, with the option to quickly follow someone back if you so choose.

To finish out this round of updates, we’ve also given you a whole new set of controls for promoting and tracking your funding rounds. We know that raising money is time-consuming, so we wanted to make AngelMD the easiest way for you to meet your goals. You can add funding rounds, and then track them directly from the sidebar so you can the information you need when you need it.

We love getting your feedback, and we look forward to hearing what you think about these new Dashboard updates. Have something on your mind? Drop us an email and let us know.

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Announcing the ACC19 Innovation Challenge Finalists

AngelMD is joining forces with the American College of Cardiology to bring you the ACC19 Innovation Challenge, as part of the ACC.19 Annual Scientific Sessions in New Orleans, Louisiana. This year, the focus is on Artificial Intelligence and Digitally-Enabled Medical Devices. We will be doing a deep dive into each of the winning companies, to be published in ACC’s Cardiology magazine.

On top of being featured in Cardiology, each winner will also receive the following:

  • A $5,000 credit toward a structured investment syndicate through AngelMD
  • A commemorative plaque presented by the ACC
  • Complimentary turnkey kiosk space at the ACC.20 Future Hub
  • Complimentary exhibit space at the ACC.20 Expo

Artificial intelligence (and relatedly, machine learning) is a hotbed topic for healthcare right now. With major medical names entering the ring, as well as companies like Apple and Amazon, AI is primed to be the topic to watch in the years to come. Here are the finalists for the ACC.19 Innovation Challenge:

Likewise, digitally-enabled medical devices are seeing some of the highest levels of investment activity. We’ve finally moved well-beyond smart watches and into a world where conditions such as hemodialysis and sudden cardiac arrest can be more closely monitored and treated through medical devices. These are the finalists from the Digitally-Enabled Medical Device category.

Join us for the ACC.19 Innovation Challenge, March 17th and 18th at the ACC’s 68th annual expo. Can’t make it to the expo? Be sure to follow AngelMD on Facebook where we will be announcing the winners as the event happens.

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Introducing the ACC.19 Innovation Challenge

Returning for its second year, the American College of Cardiology will partner with AngelMD to host the popular ACC.19 Innovation Challenge. Entrepreneurs and innovators will pitch their ideas in two categories that support cardiology. The ACC.19 Innovation Challenge is being hosted at the Future Hub Learning Destination (Expo Hall, #146) at the ACC.19 Annual Scientific Sessions in New Orleans, LA on March 17 & 18, 2019.

Your AngelMD startup profile is your application, so make sure that it is up to date. The deadline for profile updates is January 15th, 2019. 

The Categories

Artificial Intelligence Solutions – Artificial intelligence (AI) in healthcare is the use of algorithms and software to approximate human cognition in the analysis of complex medical data. The primary aim of health-related AI applications is to analyze relationships between prevention or treatment techniques and patient outcomes. Does your innovation have the ability to gain information, process it and give a well-defined output to improve the practice of cardiology? Apply to pitch

Digitally-Enabled Medical Devices – Utilizing digital technology to enhance your medical device innovation, providing valuable data that can be used to improves efficiency, care and outcomes. Is your medical device for cardiology enabled with digital technology? Register today.

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Lessons Learned from Lyft’s Entrance to Healthcare

We have a few mantras around AngelMD. One of those is “invest in what you know.” But recently we’ve also been focusing on the idea of “innovate where you are.” The theory is the same — you know more about the area in which you’re already working, so it makes sense to put your money or your work there.

Over the years, we’ve seen many instances where non-healthcare companies have used this same idea to break into the market. The latest of these comes from Lyft, an on-demand transportation company. Lyft is working toward building out a healthcare business unit that helps patients travel to non-emergency medical appointments. They company is focusing on its own wheelhouse, and then making key hires to help it transition into a new vertical.

Windpact is a great example of this idea. The company’s CEO is a former professional football player. He knew about the dangers of the sport, and he hired the right people to help build the solutions. Today Windpact is finding success outside of football, while still staying true to its roots, and even being recognized by the NFL.

The idea isn’t new, but it seems to come up more often these days. A few months ago, while we were at the Health:Further conference in Nashville, we heard these same suggestions. Dr. Suzanne Manzi, the Lead Investor for the AngelMD Syndicate for Neumentum, echoed the sentiment.

“I’ve seen promising companies, but sometimes they’re run by people who don’t have experience in the market that they’re trying to enter. They can have a great product, but the odds are stacked against them if they lack the background.”

That said, branching outside of your area of expertise isn’t forbidden territory. It’s a move that you have to handle in the right way. As Dr. Jack Lewin shared with us, it’s important to follow your passion, but it’s critical that what you’re following aligns with your experience. If that passion is too far removed, then find someone who can bridge the gap for your company. Otherwise you’ll be chasing problems that don’t exist.

Dr. Lewin’s example is HealthPals. Dr. Rajesh Dash started the company as little more than a lab with a single purpose. However, the market dictated that HealthPals could have a much larger impact than a single lab could provide. By partnering with the American College of Cardiology, HealthPals has been able to transform its business, while still holding true to its roots.

As the AngelMD network continues to grow, we see new companies join every day. There is nothing more motivating than watching a cardiologist, radiologist, or internist build a company that changes their field. Innovate in what you know, or connect with an expert in the AngelMD network. Are you next?

Join AngelMD Today

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